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Climate Science

What will our climate look like going forward?

Featuring 43 articles by 27 scientists

Massive Science Report № 1

You Don't Know GMOs

We've gathered a team of geneticists, biologists, and environmental scientists to bring you the most up-to-date report on the science, history, and safety of genetically-modified organisms.

When evolution's path leads to a dead end

The fossil record shows that nature doesn't always make the right choices

Rising seas are threatening historical sites around the world

As climate change encroaches, our heritage is drowning

Patty Hamrick

Archaeology

New York University

Tracking the history – and future – of the world's largest penguin breeding colony

Climate change is upending migration patterns that predate Cleopatra

Brittney Borowiec

Environmental Physiology

McMaster University

Comment 1 peer comment

Tree-murdering fungi and insects increasingly contribute to climate change

New research suggests carbon dioxide released from dying forests equals emissions from 11 million cars

Ellen Stuart-Haëntjens

Ecology and Biogeochemistry

Virginia Commonwealth University

Comment 1 peer comment

How atmospheric dust might help cool the planet

New research suggests an old idea of geoengineering has more merit than long suspected

Elisa Bonnin

Oceanography

University of Washington

'Being Ecological' is a book with admirable aims and a tangled execution

Prioritizing data over action can be counterproductive – but so is a muddled message

How farmers on the Great Plains are changing the local climate

New crop practices trap more carbon in the soil, increasing rainfall and adding profits

Ellen Stuart-Haëntjens

Ecology and Biogeochemistry

Virginia Commonwealth University

Comment 1 peer comment

Why don't Americans care about chemicals?

We need chemicals for daily life, but seem to feel 'apocalypse fatigue' around their dangers

Anna Robuck

Marine Science

University of Rhode Island

Comment 2 peer comments

Climate change harms everyone's health. Yes, even yours

No one evades global increases in extreme weather, disease, and injury

Renee Salas

Emergency Medicine

Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University

What Pokémon GO can teach conservationists about public engagement

In six days, players collected as much data as naturalists had in 400 years

Cassie Freund

Ecology

Wake Forest University

Low doses of contaminants, long ignored, can have vast consequences

Scientists found cocaine – and a lot of other chemicals – in Minnesota snow

To predict the future of Southern California's seas, scientists are looking to the past

The west's dramatic coastlines have masked rising tides, but that doesn’t mean the future is dry

Elisa Bonnin

Oceanography

University of Washington

Scientists were long baffled by a methane surplus in our atmosphere. The culprit: trees

It's not just flatulent cows

Cassie Freund

Ecology

Wake Forest University

Comment 2 peer comments

Creationism helped push climate skepticism into classrooms

Science education has become a political issue, but civic engagement can still work wonders

Julia York

Polar Science

University of Texas at Austin

What does California's future look like? Scientists asked trees

Blue oaks have up to 500 years of climate history written in their rings

Daniel Ackerman

Ecology

University of Minnesota

Comment 1 peer comment

What the Ice Age tells us about how plants will manage in a hotter world

New research seems to resolve a puzzle of why plants struggled in the past

Is light pollution changing how plants do – and don't – grow?

Plants depend on cycles of light. Now, they're always on

Kylla Benes

Ecology

Comment 2 peer comments

Tiny computers are transforming weather data collection

Sometimes my job is to fly sensors on kites – for science

Alison Nugent

Atmospheric Science

University of Hawaii

How fieldwork on a remote, tiny island taught me to navigate family dinners

Doing science far away helped this ecologist talk to those close to home

Jenny Howard

Ecology

Wake Forest University

It's time to stop excluding people with disabilities from science

You can be a great scientist without being able to carry a 50-pound backpack out of a cave

Gabriela Serrato Marks

Marine Geology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Biodiversity doesn't just arise out of healthy ecosystems. It helps create them

Why researchers are starting to think differently about biodiversity

We can no longer count on nature's 'self-correction' to curb warming

Plants are reaching their carbon-storage limit

Alanna Shaw

Ecosystem Ecology

University of Montana

Comment 2 peer comments

Toxic chemicals are being freed from melting glaciers

Scientists are finding decades-old DDT and PCB flowing from the Tibetan Plateau

Carrie McDonough

Oceanography

Colorado School of Mines

Comment 3 peer comments

Pollution and climate change hurt children most of all

An ER doctor explains how these shifts compound childhood illness

Renee Salas

Emergency Medicine

Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University

Comment 2 peer comments

Alaska's oilfield has been subtly changing the state's environment for decades. Will Congress notice?

A new study reveals decades of cumulative change at an oilfield where caribou raise their young

Julia York

Polar Science

University of Texas at Austin

Comment 1 peer comment

How Saharan dust can influence health all the way in Florida

Bacterial blooms could cause disease in humans and coral

The most cost-effective ways to fight climate change are literally under our feet

A new study says forests, swamps, and soil are the cheapest ways to help save the planet

Jane Zelikova

Ecology

University of Wyoming

What ancient corn farmers can teach us about engineering crops for climate change

In the era of GMO crops, farmers can learn old lessons of diversity

Gabriela Serrato Marks

Marine Geology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Comment 1 peer comment

Can Hawaii's waterfall-climbing fish survive when mountain rains change?

O'opu make extreme treks to breed that depend on stable climate conditions

Alison Nugent

Atmospheric Science

University of Hawaii

Comment 1 peer comment

Can termites teach us to build environmentally friendly communities?

Meet the researchers searching for more climate-friendly architecture

Salmaan Craig

Architecture and Thermal Engineering

Harvard University and McGill University

Comment 3 peer comments

Boobies of the Galápagos are replacing their disappearing food source with junk fish

Decades of research show how the sardine's decline threatens an entire ecosystem

Life is evolving through a hurricane of human pollution

Animals are adapting to pollutants in surprising and often costly ways

Brittney Borowiec

Environmental Physiology

McMaster University

Comment 1 peer comment

Only eight hurricanes hit New England in 100 years. Soon more will head for Boston

Climate change is shifting storm paths, and new targets are underprepared

Michael Graw

Microbial Ecology

Oregon State University

Comment 1 peer comment

We know how to fight wildfires effectively. Why don't we do it?

Prescribed burns lessen the damage, but the risk repels lawmakers

Michael Graw

Microbial Ecology

Oregon State University

We know terrifyingly little about how our bodies respond to pollutants, but that's changing

Fish DNA can change in response to pollution. What about the rest of us?

Anna Robuck

Marine Science

University of Rhode Island

Comment 2 peer comments

What modern conservationists can learn from humanity's long history with rainforests

There's a growing body of evidence that humans have been modifying tropical forests for over 40,000 years

Feeding the world as the climate changes will depend on genetic engineering

CRISPR and other tech could help us produce more food, but only if we drop the GMO stigma

Jackie Grimm

Molecular Biology

Princeton University

Some good news: peatlands might help store more carbon as temperatures rise

Don't drain these swamps

Becky Parker

Environmental Science

Nova Scotia Nature Trust

Want to know where hard-to-find squid live? Ask their predators

Look, sometimes you need to "offload water" from a giant albatross...for science

Rebecca Flynn

Environmental Science

University of Rhode Island

How stressed-out fish are teaching us about human heart disease

Farmed fish and office-bound humans face a common problem

Kelsey Lucas

Physiology, Marine Biology, and Ecology

Harvard University

We've poured thousands of manmade chemicals into the ocean. Now they're mixing in unpredictable ways.

We're just starting to learn about the effects of POP soup and what we can do about it.

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Seagrass meadows protect fish, coral and humans from disease – and we’re losing them

This seemingly mundane plant might be more important than we realize.

Megan Chen

Marine Biology

Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Conservationists can't tackle all of the ocean's problems at once, so scientists are helping them triage

The ocean contains many vulnerable ecosystems that need protecting. So where should we start?

Abrahim El Gamal

Marine Chemical Biology

Scripps Institution of Oceanography